Preserving and Protecting Our Precious Civic Ecosystem

Jacob Z. Hess shares his thoughts on preserving the civic ecosystem in our own communities on the Bridge Alliance blog.

Taking lessons from last year's Utah Citizen summit, author and co-founder of AllofLife.org, Jacob Hess shared a blog post on the transpartisan network Bridge Alliance website exploring the state of the United States' "civic ecosystem".

Like those who gather who practice meditation and gather with others for ongoing support and training, we aim to be a community of like-minded folks who support each other in “honing the craft.” Part of this “practice network” approach is helping each other make space and time for the practice, much like a meditation network encourages each other to “keep practicing.”

Why do we make time for this?

Because it’s worth prioritizing. Rather than waiting for national leaders to figure out how to talk across differences, our network of Utah citizens are committed to do whatever we can cultivate and preserve the civic ecosystem in our own communities. Once again, instead of advocating one technique, one organization or one practice as holding the singular capacity to “save” us from our current political atrophy, our overriding focus is on the complex and multiform civic ecosystem needed in order for communities to thrive. Just as, in nature, no single species in an ecosystem can thrive without a degree of interdependence on other forms of life, so too must efforts toward constructive dialogue draw strength from a web of other existing efforts. In this way, we envision Utah becoming a national model of what it takes to fight to protect a robust ecosystem for civic engagement, and in this way, strengthen our democracy.

In his article, Jacob offers links to several programs dedicated to this mission and examples of success in his home state of Utah.

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