Appeals Court Upholds Repeal Of Net-Neutrality

Credit: Gage Skidmore / CC-BY-SA 2.0/ Flickr

Andrew Wagner

On Tuesday, the DC Court of Appeals voted to uphold the 2017 repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules

On Tuesday, the DC Court of Appeals voted to uphold the 2017 repeal of Obama-era net neutrality rules, according to The Hill. The Federal Communication Commission (FCC) is a 5 person panel that made the decision to repeal net neutrality in 2017.

Net neutrality is the concept that Internet Service Providers (ISP) has to provide access to all sites, website content, and applications at the same speed, without blocking content.

FCC chairman Ajit Pai was happy with the results and stated, "today’s decision is a victory for consumers, broadband deployment, and the free and open Internet."

It was not all smooth sailing for the FCC, however.

The court ruled that the FCC had exceeded its legal authority by attempting to block states from passing their own net neutrality rules, which many did to combat the FCC’s repeal. The court ruled that states can set their own net-neutrality policies independent of the federal government.

Following the court's ruling, there was a push from members of the House to allow a vote on net neutrality in the Senate.

Earlier this year, the House voted to reinstate the Obama-era net neutrality rules. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said that the bill would be dead on arrival.

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