Trump Judicial Pick Defended the KKK in Online Comments

Judicial nominee Brett Talley used an alias to make online comments defending the original intent of the KKK, which he claims was different than the later violent version. (Image credit: Youtube/Liberty Day Institute)

Brett Talley, Trump's pick to fill a federal district court seat in Alabama, went out of his way to defend the original intent of the Ku Klux Klan in comments he made under an alias online.

Using the name "BamainBoston" on TideFans.com, Talley indicated the KKK was upstanding until racial violence entered the mix. According to the Hill, he said:

"It was only after the perceived depredations of the Union army during reconstruction that Forrest joined (it is highly unlikely that he founded or acted as the Grand Wizard) the first KKK, which was entirely different than the KKK of the early 19th Century." " When the Klan turned to racial violence, he distanced himself from the organization as he had long supported the reconciliation of the races."

This is not Talley's first run-in with the media as he awaits confirmation, making headlines previously for missing information on his Senate questionnaire:

The New York Times reported Monday that Brett J. Talley, an already controversial nominee for federal district judge in Alabama, failed to disclose on a Senate questionnaire his marriage to a White House lawyer.

Along with being enamored with the KKK, the Intellectualist has reported that Talley is also a ghost hunter with a conflict of interest.

On his questionnaire for the Senate Judiciary Committee, a copy of which was provided to The Daily Beast, Talley says that he was part of The Tuscaloosa Paranormal Research Group from 2009-2010. The group, according to its website, searches for the truth “of the paranormal existence” in addition to helping “those who may be living with paranormal activity that can be disruptive and/or traumatic.”

Aside from everything else previously mentioned, Talley has been called 'unqualified' by the American Bar Association. He also failed to tell the U.S. Senate that his wife works in the Trump White House.

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