Rick Scott’s Grandchildren Will Distance Learn Instead Of Physically Attending

Senator Scott is pictured on the right.Screengrab / Varney & Co. / Twitter

PMH

Scott: “My daughters are going to be more focused on distance learning right now to make sure their children are safe.”

Florida Politics reports that in an appearance on the Fox Business Networks’ Varney & Co., Senator Rick Scott (R-FL) affirmed calls to hold in-person K-12 schooling while also mentioning that his own grandchildren will be distance learning.

  • Scott said that parents should have a “choice” for their children, and that that choice should include both physical classrooms and distance learning.
  • He suggested that parents might need their students to attend classes physically in order to access “a subsidized meal.” However, KJZZ reports that school districts in other parts of the nation, such as Arizona, have found ways to provide subsidized and free meals for low-income students even during closures.
  • Scott complimented Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, who came under criticism from parents when he instructed schools to roll out full reopenings for the new school year in August.

Nevertheless, Scott noted that his own family is forgoing in-person learning. He said,

My daughters are going to be more focused on distance learning right now to make sure their children are safe. But I know other parents are going to want to make sure their kids are in the classroom.

  • Scott’s comments come after Governor Ron DeSantis distanced himself from Corcoran’s order.
  • On July 20, DeSantis said of Corcoran’s announcement, “Well, first of all, I didn’t give any executive order.”
  • Florida Politics accused DeSantis of “suggest[ing] that on this issue, like the decision to close bars, political appointees somehow got to make unfettered calls about how large economic sectors will go, free of interference from the man who put them in place.”
  • DeSantis has also said that parents should be “free to choose” distance learning over physical learning and that instructors concerned about exposure should feel free to “teach virtually or maybe they take a sabbatical.”

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