Ironically, If Not For Immigrants, Trump’s Employment Figures Would Look Bad

Screengrab/Inside Edition/YouTube

From January 2017 to February 2019, the number of foreign-born individuals in the workforce increased by 2.1 million.

On Monday Russell Vought, the acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, was asked how the Trump administration could rationalize adding trillions to the national debt after Trump repeatedly promised during his campaign that the debt would fall, The Washington Post reported.

“He also came into office and had an economic recovery that was needed to put people back to work, get the economy going and to rebuild the military, and had historic levels of military at $700 billion and $716 billion in — in national defense dollars,” Vought said.

Vought did not mention that debt was driven higher by a decline in corporate tax revenue due to the Republican tax bill in 2017. More, the peak unemployment under Trump was 4.7%, which is where it was when he came into office.

Over the weekend, Trump tweeted, “More people are working today in the United States, 158,000,000, than at any time in our Country’s history. That is a Big Deal!”

The figure is actually under 157 million, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ report. More, while there are more Americans working now, there are also more Americans. Part of that phenomenon is thanks to immigration. Over a third of Trump’s new jobs went to immigrants. Additionally, the unemployment rate among immigrants is lower than among native-born Americans.

From January 2017 to February 2019, the U.S. workforce increased by 5.7 million, and the number of foreign-born individuals in the workforce increased by 2.1 million.

A huge part of the increase in employment comes from the growing population, and a huge part of the growing population comes from immigration.

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