Fox’s Judge Napolitano: “Of Course”, There Was Evidence Of “Collusion”

Fox News judicial analyst and former judge Andrew Napolitano.Screengrab/Fox News/YouTube

Andrew Napolitano said Mueller couldn't establish conspiracy beyond a reasonable doubt, but there was surely evidence.

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian election interference and possible collusion with the Trump campaign assuredly turned up evidence of a conspiracy, according to Fox News judicial analyst and former judge Andrew Napolitano.

Napolitano argued on Wednesday that Attorney General William Barr “has opened a can of worms” with his word choice in the four-page summary of Mueller’s report delivered to Congress on Sunday, according to Newsweek.

“When he [Barr] said in his four-page letter that the government could not establish the existence of a conspiracy–he meant it could not establish it beyond a reasonable doubt,” Napolitano argued. “Did they find some evidence of conspiracy? Of course they did! If they didn’t, he would have told us.”

As he picked apart Barr’s wording in the summary, Napolitano said the letter has invited further congressional investigations and that it encouraged President Donald Trump’s critics to push for a public release of the report and supporting documents.

“It’s gonna end with the revelation of the Mueller report and the ability of members of Congress to second guess Mueller’s decision,” he said. Concluding his comments, Napolitano explained that “there’s no certain answer here, except that the constitution applies to all of us. And the basic principle of the law is that nobody is above its requirements or below its obligations.”

The fate of Mueller’s report and who will be permitted to read it remains up in there air: Barr has said it will be weeks before he and Mueller’s team have reviewed the report to determine what might need to be redacted.

Democrats have already indicated they will fight for the report’s public release.

Watch Napolitano’s Judge Napolitano’s Chambers segment:

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