Famed Pathologist Michael Baden Says Jeffrey Epstein Autopsy Pointed To Homicide

JakeThomas

Former NYC chief medical examiner Dr. Michael Baden sat in on Epstein's autopsy, and he doesn't think it was suicide.

Conspiracy theories abound following the death of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, and now New York City’s former chief medical examiner — who sat in on Epstein’s autopsy by request of the family — says all signs point to homicide.

The official cause of death was determined as suicide by hanging, The New York Post noted, but forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden disagrees with the assessment.

Baden told Fox News on Wednesday that Epstein’s hyoid bone was broken in three places, a finding he said is inconsistent with suicide but indicative of homicide by ligature strangulation.

Epstein was found hanged in his jail cell in August amid curious circumstances, including a jail security camera that malfunctioned and two guards who fell asleep during their overnight shift.

Baden said Epstein’s family requested his presence at the autopsy, noting that the financier’s brother is concerned over the safety of other individuals if Epstein’s death was actually a homicide.

“The brother is concerned that if [Epstein] was murdered, then other people who have information might be at risk,” Baden insisted, appearing to suggest that powerful individuals might have been involved in Epstein’s death. “If they think he has information, his life could be in jeopardy.”

He said there was “unusual” activity “from day one” regarding the autopsy, The Post noted, and told Fox News that in 50 years of examinations, he had never seen such bone fractures in suicide deaths.

“Hanging does not cause these broken bones and homicide does,” Baden said. “A huge amount of pressure was applied.”

What’s more, results from DNA testing have never been released, he said.

“They took fingernail clippings to see if there’s anybody else’s DNA on it and that hasn’t been released, neither has information about whose DNA is on the ligature out of torn strips of orange sheets,” Baden noted, adding that whoever made the ligature would have left DNA on the material.

Baden also pointed to the circumstances at the jail on the night Epstein died, insisting it is highly unlikely that two guards would fall asleep on the job at the same time.

“Occasionally a guard falls asleep — never two guards at the same time,” he said, adding that it was also suspicious that cameras in Epstein’s cell and hallway were not working on the night of his death.

“There were 800 other people in the correctional facility and most of them would have liked to have gotten their hands on him,” Baden acknowledged. But he added that “A number of people had to be involved if this was a homicide.”

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