At The UN, A Pariah President Finds That Few Wish To Help His Agenda

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President Trump stands alone on several key issues as world leaders come together for the UN's General Assembly.

As world leaders gather in New York City for the United Nations’ General Assembly, President Donald Trump once again stands alone in his foreign policy agenda and other key issues, increasingly leaving the U.S. as an outsider to global partnerships.

The Washington Post notes that Trump is not only alone certain issues but also likely to face push back from other members — an unusual position for the U.S. to hold.

> For one, U.S. allies, once willing to follow America’s lead, are increasingly forging their own paths, building new partnerships independent of Washington and, at times, even acting against the Trump administration’s plans. On trade, Canada, the European Union and Japan have all stepped up their cooperation. Initiatives to tackle climate change — a cause for which Trump has repeatedly expressed disdain — will be raised by numerous world leaders, including French President Emmanuel Macron, who will convene a special session on the future of the planet.

Trump also is likely to feel isolated when it comes to U.S. policy concerning Iran:

> Trump probably will receive minimal support when he chairs a Security Council session Wednesday, where he is expected to berate Iran — every other permanent member of the council was opposed to Trump’s withdrawal from the nuclear deal with Tehran. Diplomats at the United Nations have also objected to the White House’s other attacks on U.N. bodies, including its defunding of the U.N.'s Palestinian-aid agency and threats leveled at the International Criminal Court.

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> “Diplomats in New York see two major political trends reshaping the organization. The first is the U.S. systematically and loudly distancing itself from U.N. bodies and initiatives it doesn’t like,” wrote Richard Gowan, a senior fellow at the United Nations University Center for Policy Research in New York. “The second is the focus with which China is gaining power and influence [at U.N. headquarters]. America’s voluble president may own the podium at the General Assembly, but quietly, in the windowless committee rooms of the U.N., Chinese diplomats are busy reshaping the ground rules of international cooperation to Beijing’s liking.”

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