Adidas and Allbirbs are Partnering to Decrease Carbon Footprint of Shoes

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Adidas and Allbirds are partnering to decrease the carbon footprint of shoes and help clean up Earth's pollution problem

The footwear industry emits 700 million metric tons of carbon dioxide every year, making it one of the worst polluting sectors in fashion according to ES Lifestyle.

The average running shoe has a carbon footprint of around 13.6 kg CO22. A cotton t-shirt has a footprint of around 8.7 kg CO22. Adidas and Allbirds are partnering to change these facts and help clean up our planet by creating a sporty shoe with the lowest carbon footprint in history. The companies plan to share their insights, innovations, and supply chain processes. Additionally, they plan to research renewable materials and forms of transportation.

Allbirbs has been a sustainable shoe producer since its inception. The company's "Tread Lighter" program was created to reduce carbon emissions and limited anything that violated its 100 percent carbon neutral business model.

Adidas introduced the world's first recyclable running shoe last year. The company also committed to a 30 percent reduction in its carbon footprint by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2050. VP of Adidas Brand Strategy, James Carnes wants the two brands to be “catalysts and creators of substantial improvement. The recent progress that our brands have made in the name of sustainable innovation has created the perfect momentum for this partnership to influence industry practices forever.”

The carbon footprint of products will utilize Allbirds' life cycle assessment tool. These new shoes will not affect performance. “While we are prioritising the planet, we’re staying committed to improving the athlete's experience,” says Carnes. “That means the end result should yield no compromises for athletes or the planet.” The companies plan to rollout their first joint product sometime in 2021.

“There is an urgent need to reduce our global carbon number, and this mission is bigger than just Allbirds or adidas,” says Tim Brown, co-CEO of Allbirds. “Whether we realise it or not this is a race that we are all running together as a planet and it is one that trumps the day-to-day competition of individual companies. I am hopeful that this partnership will be an example for others to follow as we pursue a more sustainable, net zero carbon future. This is a problem that won't be solved by one company alone.”

Allbirds and Adidas are making a great move to help the planet and all of the inhabitants.

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