US Infrastructure Around Small Towns Is Hurting

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Bad road conditions are prevalent in small agricultural towns in the US along with a lack of tax funding.

Bad road conditions are prevalent in small agricultural towns in the US along with a lack of tax funding, according to The New York Times.

Trempealeau County in central-west Wisconsin is one of the main cities faced with this issue. One resident, Kellen Nelson said, “Our road hasn’t been paved since the ’60s." Their family owns a farm on the main road that has only ever received, “patching and seal coating."

The Midwest and South have felt the largest effects of the crumbling rural infrastructure. Two-thirds of the nation's freight comes from rural areas. “It is not real stable — the shoulders are eroding in many places,” Mr. Nelson said. “When you’re going through with an 80,000-pound load of soybeans and meeting cars, that’s dangerous.”

A fully loaded semi-trailer truck can inflict 5,000 to 10,000 times the road damage of one car. The roads in these areas haven't stood a chance and the temporary bandaids that patching and seal coating provide are far from sufficient.

The road repairs in Trempealeau are estimated to cost between $60 to $80 million and there has been no state or federal assistance to cover these costs. Roads are estimated to last 30 years, but the roads in Trempealeau average 74 years old.

Bad road conditions are prevalent in small agricultural towns in the US along with a lack of tax funding.

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