NHTSA Probes Tesla’s Model S Battery Cooling System

Matty-Sways

Two different third party tests discovered the use of weak aluminum around the end fitting of the cooling system.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating a design defect in Tesla’s Model S battery cooling system, according to Business Insider.

Tesla’s cooling system has been questioned since 2012 that it may leak coolant into the battery, which in turn, could cause a fire or make the battery go dead.

It is “well aware of the reports regarding this issue and will take action if appropriate based upon the facts and data,” said the NHTSA in a statement.

The NHTSA said that “auto manufacturers are obligated to let it know within five days of being aware of a safety-related defect in a vehicle. Then they’re supposed to issue a recall.”

While Tesla was trying to get Model S cars to customers as soon as possible, two different third party tests discovered the use of weak aluminum around the end fitting of the system. “The tiny pinholes would form where the male and female parts of the end fitting were supposed to be brazed together.”

By the end of 2012, Tesla “continued to find leaking coils in various stages of production,” according to internal documents. Some leaks were found as “critical quality issues,” or were found to have leaked liquid into the battery pack.

Read the full story here.

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