Google faces $5 billion lawsuit in U.S. for tracking 'private' internet use

Gene Naumovsky

Incognito might not be that private after all.

A lawsuit filed against Google on Tuesday seeks $5 billion from Alphabet Inc. over allegations of an illegal privacy invasion concerning user activity in “private” mode, according to Reuters.

The complaint was filed in the federal court of San Jose, California. The lawsuit says that through Google Analytics, Google Ad Manager, and other functions, Google has collected user data, even when users failed to click on any Google-supported ads. The complaint further details this activity, stating that the company even uses the “most intimate and potentially embarrassing things” to gather user profiles. The complaint reads, “(Google) cannot continue to engage in the covert and unauthorized data collection from virtually every American with a computer or phone.”

Aggressively defending his company, Google spokesman Jose Castaneda said, “As we clearly state each time you open a new incognito tab, websites might be able to collect information about your browsing activity.”

Charging $5,000 in damages for every user, the lawsuit utilizes California’s privacy laws and federal wiretapping violations to build the case. Millions are speculated to have had data secretly stolen while using “private” mode.

Plaintiffs Chason Brown, Maria Nguyen, and William Byatt are being represented by Boies Schiller & Flexner. The case can be identified as Brown et al v Google LLC et al, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 20-03664.

Read the full story here.

Comments

Economics, Finance and Investing

FEATURED
COMMUNITY