Baylor University Survey On Religion: 'Almost No Atheists Voted For Trump'

Baylor University has released its 2017 survey on American religion. The general trend among Americans is that as a people they have grown less religious but they have also grown more political.

Baylor University has released its 2017 survey on American religion. The general trend among Americans is that as a people they have grown less religious but they have also grown more political.

Some interesting tidbits from the study:

"Every single religious indicator predicts voting for Trump…except two; unless you belong to a black Protestant church, or if you belong to a non-Christian house of worship,” said Paul Froese, Professor of Sociology at Baylor and director of Baylor Religion Surveys."

After looking at how religious values, behaviors and beliefs predicted political support for Trump, they found most people who voted for him said they were “very religious,” were members of white, Evangelical Protestant churches, viewed the U.S. as a Christian nation, believed in an authoritative God who was actively engaged in world affairs, saw Muslims as a threat to America, opposed LGBT rights, and valued gender traditionalism (a feeling that men are better suited for politics and should get higher wages than women, women should take care of the children, and those who did work were deficient mothers).

Almost no atheists voted for Trump,” said Froese of the respondents.Muslims are the most feared religious group by Americans, followed by atheists and conservative Christians, said Park.

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