These Two Republican Men Are Standing In The Way Of Women’s Equality

Actress and activist Alyssa Milano tweeted out an urgent call to action

Watch Alyssa Milano's video:

Right now, two male lawmakers in Virginia are working hard to keep the Equal Rights Amendment from a vote on the House floor: Chairman Mark Cole of the Privileges and Elections Committee and Speaker of the House, Kirk Cox.

This is not just an issue for Virginia, this affects everyone in America. Your action is immediately needed. If you live in Virginia, please call these lawmakers and tell them to bring the ERA vote to the floor:

Mark Cole: 804 6981088

Kirk Cox: 804 698 1066

If you don't live in VA, you can tweet to these men and tell them to bring the ERA to a vote:

Twitter:

@MarkColeVA

@SpeakerCox

94% of Americans support constitutional equality for women and men, 80% mistakenly think it already exists.

The Equal Rights Amendment text:

Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

This gender inclusive text protects both women and men from gender discrimination. It is not just a women’s issue, it is a civil rights issue.

The ERA would provide constitutional protection against gender discrimination.

The ERA found new life during the second wave of the feminist movement in the 1970s. 35 states ratified it and only three more states were needed. Enshrining it into the Constitution seemed inevitable until one conservative woman successfully halted the momentum.

For decades, ERA activists fought to bring the equality amendment to a vote, but it wasn’t until 2017 that headway was made. Nevada became the 36th state to ratify and was followed by Illinois in 2018. That leaves one more state, and activists in Virginia are getting close to victory.

In a 2011 interview with California Lawyer, former conservative Justice Antonin Scalia was asked if the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects against discrimination on the basis of gender or sexual orientation. Scalia said it does not:

“Certainly, the Constitution does not require discrimination on the basis of sex. The only issue is whether it prohibits it. It doesn’t."

Let's change this. #ERANow

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Kimberley Johnson
EditorKimberley Johnson
Kimberley Johnson
EditorKimberley Johnson
Kimberley Johnson
EditorKimberley Johnson
Kimberley Johnson
EditorKimberley Johnson
Kimberley Johnson
EditorKimberley Johnson