Whether the courts reject Trump's travel ban or not, it looks like it might already be having its desired effect: limiting travel from high-risk countries. With so much uncertainty surrounding the travel ban, my guess is that residents of the six listed countries (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) are simply opting out of travel to the US for fear of being detained, investigated/interrogated, or otherwise inconvenienced during their travels. This is probably just speculation, but my guess is also that potential terror threats might be making note of the increased security precautions that now cover entry into the US.

I personally support both the constitutionality and reasoning behind the travel ban, but what do you all think? I'm sure there are more than a few of you who disagree ;)

Comments
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Wolfbeckett
Wolfbeckett

Just like with illegal immigration across our southern border, just the fact that we have a president signalling that he takes that issue seriously and wants to fix it is enough to fix a lot of it all on it's own. Illegal immigration is down significantly since Trump took office because it turns out that if you tell people you are actually going to enforce existing immigration laws many of them won't bother to try in the first place. Funny how actually enforcing the law convinces people to not break it. I think there might be some correlation there.

As for the travel ban, good. I don't think it goes far enough, I think there's a lot of countries, like Saudi Arabia, that should be on the list and aren't. Immigrating to the United States is not a human right that all people on this planet are simply born with. It should be a privilege granted to those who show that they will bring something to the table. Those that are willing to work hard, who embrace our cultural mores, who want to BE American instead of wanting to be a Somali who happens to live in America. People who are entrepreneurial, people who will benefit our society instead of becoming just another welfare leech sucking the blood of the productive. My heart goes out to people in the rest of the world who were not blessed to be born in America, it really does. But it is not our moral responsibility to be Santa Claus for the entire world.

And the "tired and poor" line doesn't cut it, sorry. That line was written on a statue that was given to us by the French, it's not part of the American constitution and was not part of what the founding fathers built in this country. And besides that, it was written at a time when our country had no welfare safety net at all. "Give us your tired and your poor" is all well and good as long as those of us who work hard and pay our taxes don't have to pay for them when they fail. But we have a significant welfare state now and that means we have not only the right, but the moral responsibility to make sure we are choosing who we let in more carefully. If money is going to be forcibly extorted from the citizenry and redistributed to the "tired and poor", we have a duty to make sure the new people we let in do not fall into that category.

bitter-clinger
bitter-clinger

and also, what did your diatrabe have to do with my post that non citizens, specifically illegals, who are convicted of a crime in this country should not get the same protections as prisoners that are US citizens? immigrants can be citizens also.

bitter-clinger
bitter-clinger

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bitter-clinger
bitter-clinger

LMMFAO...you dont know me, I have worked construction most of my life and have worked among immigrants, both illegal and legal, and they are just like any other group, they include the industrious and lazy, the kind and the vicious. not all immigrants are hard working family people, just like not all are rapists as Las Zetas enforcers. and you can highly doubt all you want, but Americans are a hard working people too(with the notable exception of these peice of crap youngsters who do nothing all day but facegram and instabook on their fancy nancy phones), and Americans are still working in every single field that immigrants work in, including agricultural work. and letting in any and everybody and not requiring a sacrifice to stay and be part of the best nation,doesnt make a country great, it makes it stupid. I have no problem with an immigrant who wants to become a citizen and learns about our constitution and the values of our forefathers, but I have less than zero tolerance for immigrants who support infringing on our rights, and refuse to at least partially assimilate into our culture.

lafillefrancaise
lafillefrancaise

@bitter-clinger - That's not reality, just letting you know. Haha. The US does not always abide by those rules, I agree, but the US cannot commit human rights violations (see Abu Ghraib). If the US wants to remain the "best country in the world," it must act like it, even if people like you disagree. Also, try living as an immigrant in this country for a week. Immigrants are some of the hardest working people you will ever meet, and I highly doubt most Americans could endure the backbreaking work that they do on a daily basis.