Hi, one of the reasons I've got interested by you is when you mentioned your father was Chinese and your mother, French Canadian. I am myself Acadian and I've had a passion for East-Asia for a long time so I have a few questions relating to both your ancestral cultures. I hope you don't mind.

What language(s) did you speak at home?

Can you read Chinese characters?

How do you feel about your mother's native culture?

Comments (3)
No. 1-3
contributor77
contributor77

@RoamingMillennial Do you have lineage going back to the original Acadians? In that case you might be interested in our history. Acadians were French but they worked together with Mi'kmaqs and other tribes, they accepted race mixing. Acadians were deported from current Nova Scotia from the British in 1755. About a third of the population died during this event, the Brits separated families sending loved ones and children to different colonies scattering the population all across the Atlantic. In case you are a descendant of those people, since you mentioned your grand-mother, be aware that Acadians were along the most progressive settlers in the Colonial Era and it's really hard to blame them for anything.

contributor77
contributor77

So you do speak some French! :) I have studied the Japanese language over the years, although my grammar is still in the basics I was able to recognize about a thousand kanjis a couple months ago ( I don't study at this moment because I'm too busy).

I grew up in New-Brunswick. I wish I could make you discover our little world!

Thank you for responding, I understand a lot of people are trying to reach out to you.

RoamingMillennial
RoamingMillennial

Cool! My grandmother's heritage is Acadian from New Brunswick :)

I speak English at home, with French and Cantonese thrown in (especially if I'm trying to get on my parents' good side ha).

Sadly I can't read many Chinese characters, I REALLY wish pinyin was everywhere.

I actually don't really identify much with my mom's culture (French Canadian), and I think that's mostly because I wasn't raised in it. Politically and socially I don't really share much in common with Quebec society, and I often feel like an outsider in Montreal. There's so much of the Quebecois experience that I was never exposed to growing up (hockey, winters, St Jean Baptiste, little things like that).



Konoruck
Konoruck
New Comment
1