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No. 1-3
Rinku
Rinku

Editor

I think the race version would be something like this racism is soft, white supremacy is hard. or implicit bias is soft, explicit bias is hard. thinking on this. haven't read this other piece yet but will soon.

kiki
kiki

Hi Rinku, Thanks for your words. Ben and I were just wondering what would be analogous to misogyny with respect to racism. Policing? The punishment model has some severe limitations. Even if every perpetrator of sexual abuse were punished, harm and damage would still have been done and structural racism and sexism would still be active. Here are some interesting thoughts on the limitations of punishment. I am curious what you think: http://thefearlessheart.org/metoo-and-liberation-for-all/

Rinku
Rinku

Editor

Thanks for posting this, Kiki. This is a long and complex piece that took me some time, but definitely worth reading. Manne coins the word "himpathy" here and I love it. She refers to the excessive sympathy for the male perpetrators of violence against women. She doesn't say that perpetrators deserve no sympathy, but points to the question of proportion - the call for instant forgiveness when the man is caught, the tears over their lost careers overriding relief that they have been stopped. I also really liked the distinction she makes between sexism and misogyny -- related but a different vibe. “Sexism wears a lab coat; misogyny goes on witch hunts [...] Sexism is bookish; misogyny is combative." A lot of this reminds me of the distinction we make in racial justice thinking between racist impact and intention. When something happens, people ask "does the perpetrator hate all immigrants/Black people/Latinos" when the most important question is "has harm been done?"