“First they came for Jefferson Davis, but I didn’t know who he was"

This week in New Orleans a battle for reality has taken place, although you’d be want to hear about it in the news.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu has slated the removal of four Civil War monuments. The first, an obelisk commemorating an 1874 rebellion, has already been removed. The statue of Jefferson Davis is likely to be next, although the exact date of removal is still unreleased by the mayor. The situation has attracted self-motivated patriots of all ages to come down and protest in defense of the monuments. It has also attracted the Antifa, who have come to demand the monument removal, and to assault and suppress the free speech of the patriot supporters. There have been both peaceful and violent interactions (as would be expected when large numbers of political terrorists like Antifa are bussed into a situation). With the fight over the statue of Jefferson Davis heating up and with the statues of generals P.T.G. Beauregard and Robert E. Lee scheduled for removal, the battle appears to have only begun.

It’s a form of civil war itself, a sort of Civil War 2. And like many other sequels, one that should have never been made.

See, the reason this whole battle is happening is because a lot of people, including many of the so called “professors” we have inculcating our youth, did NOT pay attention in grade school history class. Or middle school. And just forget about high school. Nobody was paying attention then.

The sad reality we live in is not only do our young people not know what our history was, they don’t know WHY they need to know it. If they “need to” know something, Wikipedia will tell them what they should know in an instant, so no need cluttering up the brain with all those unnecessary facts. It’s so old fashioned. So unmodern. To know things.

Things like who the Civil War was about. The SJW crowd is quick to tell you WHAT the Civil War was about, namely slavery, although we could fill a library of tomes debating the true complexities that led to the Civil War. Thankfully, someone already has, so all we would have to do is actually read some of that information and actually learn…..oh, sorry. That’s not what SJWs do.

Who the Civil War was about is a different question. And it’s the question that explains why the statue of Jefferson Davis, or Beauregard, or Robert E. Lee should be protected and treasured instead of vilified and destroyed.

So WHO was the Civil War about? Ultimately, it was about brothers, and fathers and sons that went and fought and died in backyard battlefields. It was about the women who sent those men off to battle, and stayed home to struggle alone. The vast majority of people who were affected by the Civil War, the vast number of men who died fighting the war, did not have slaves. In fact some were slaves themselves, and former slaves. On both the Confederate and Union sides of the war, the average citizen fighting wasn’t fighting for the right to own slaves. They were fighting to protect their land, their families, their liberty and their lives. And there were great men who led those brave men in battle, and history rightfully remembers and recognizes them. By doing so, we not only honor the lives of those on both sides that were lost, but we also provide a vehicle for communicating to the younger generation the HUMAN element of history. Not just the politicalized simplifications, but the humanity of where we as a people have been. A statue of a man like Jefferson Davis, or Robert E. Lee are there to provide the literal human face of history for us future generations to see and understand: war may start because of ideas, but it’s fought with flesh and blood. And sometimes, you lose.

The fascist left in this country has long made it their mission to dehumanize history in order to make it irrelevant. It’s the only way to convince yet another generation that the ridiculous theory of collectivism will work. You see, collectivism is an IDEA, much like the idea of slavery. In practice, the humans under such a system suffer, also very similar to slavery. When we remember the humans who made history, we remember the suffering, and we as natural freedom loving beings seek to avoid that suffering. But when we forget the human element, when we “remember” history as only the ideas, we are easily convinced that THIS time the idea will work, there will be no suffering and utopia will be obtained. THIS time, evil people won’t take over the collected power and use it to commit mass murder and genocide. We promise, say the leftists…you can believe us because you never learned anything different in history class.

So the old adage of history and it’s infernal repeating yet again rubs it in our face how true it really is. We are once again living in the time of book burnings and historic monument destruction, not from barbarian hoards, or bible thumping rubes, but from the “college educated” left. Much like the hoards and rubes, these “enlightened” souls were not educated as much as they were indoctrinated, and like hoards and rubes their dogma must be protected from outside facts at all costs. So the statues of Confederate generals must go, and for that matter, they’ve banned the Dukes of Hazzard and that car too. Just to be extra safe that no history sneaks in. A social justice WARRIOR has no time or need for history.

But humanity does. Humanity doesn’t want to be warriors all the time. They want to live in peace, and be free to live their own life. The only way to do that is to teach history to our young people, to explain to them the preciousness of peace, and the cost of losing it. To teach them the stories of the men and women who fought and died in the quest for that peace. To show them the human faces of our most painful moments of history, so they might choose the path of peace and liberty whenever possible. The faces of the winners AND the losers in life’s battles teach us to be human in the face of life itself. Justice for society lies in REMEMBERING our history, not tearing it down.

Something the SJW left would know…if they’d just paid attention in history class.

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