The Right Way Vs. The Wise Way

Does doing the RIGHT thing mean you are doing the WISE thing?

Several times in our lifetime we find ourselves at crossroads. We are faced with decisions that sometimes have enormous consequences. For example, we may have to decide between what is right and what is wrong. These sorts of crossroads are simple if we have a calibrated moral compass, but a more sophisticated crossroad appears when we are faced with the decision between what is right and what is wise. Knowing what is right is typically related to knowledge but doing what is right is entirely a matter of wisdom.

Although President Donald Trump has been cooperative with the special counsel investigation into Russian interference and collusion, Democrats continue to take part in self-generated hysteria over the possibility of Mueller being terminated. The left-wing media’s manic coverage of Trump’s tweets, when critiquing Mueller and those involved in the investigation, are indicative of a legitimate fear and uncertainty on their behalf. As a matter of fact, for several months now, the media has been predicting Mueller’s termination while explaining how the nation is teetering on the edge of a Constitutional Crisis.

I’m sure the cogs in their minds struggle to turn as they try to reconcile why this psychotic, irrational and criminal President hasn’t rid himself of this troublesome special counsel. Tact and restraint are entirely out of character for the first American dictator, right? But let’s assume for a moment that Trump is a reasonable and intellectual individual who possesses dexterity of mind and nimbleness of character. As hard as that may be for some, it might provide us with an understanding, if not a blueprint, for how he intends to deal with the special counsel.

I understand that even hypothetically believing Trump is a reasonable and intellectual person may be impossible for some; so instead, let’s put ourselves in his shoes:

Imagine with me for a moment that you are the newly elected President of the United States. Your campaign was a success resulting in an electoral college victory; however, the opposition is convinced that you colluded with the Russians to weaponize information and manipulate millions of Americans to vote for you. They accuse you of launching an information war with surgical precision, because although your opponent won the popular vote by over 3 million votes, you were able to incredibly defeat the electoral collage by way of deceit. A special counsel is chosen to investigate your alleged crimes costing the nation millions of dollars with each passing month.

The investigation progresses to the one-year mark and there is absolutely NO evidence to support the charges against you. Although it would be legal, would it be right to terminate the special counsel?

If you answered ‘yes’ you are right, if you answered ‘no’ you are wise. The wisest thing the President can do at this moment is allow the special counsel to continue operating within the parameters of the law. Although critics may say that the investigation has taken one too many unconstitutional left turns, the court of public opinion still has the President on death row. Although no criminal punishment usually results in the court of public opinion, this is where elections are won and political real estate gained.

The Democrats have chosen to use the paralyzing power of the special counsel as manacles around Trump’s neck. They have successfully found a way to back him into a corner and somewhat cripple his mobility for an indefinite period of time. The genius lies in the fact that whether he fires Mueller due to his innocence or due to his guilt, the result and bi-partisan scrutiny would be identical.

President Trump finds himself at a very important crossroad. If he fires the special counsel, it may very well be the unwinding of his Presidency. If he continues to allow the special counsel to operate, despite the gross political and overt biases, the onus lies directly on Mueller’s shoulders to produce a case that even Johnnie Cochran couldn’t defend. The entire left-wing establishment has bet all their chips on the criminality of Trump-- I’m not a betting man, but I reckon that’s neither the wise or right thing to do.

Comments
No. 1-11
FelixCulpa
FelixCulpa

Just to be clear, Trump can't fire Mueller. Not just because it wouldn't be right, wise or legal, but because it's not up to him. He'd have to fire Rosenstein first, get his own appointee in there, then hope that the appointee was willing to risk an obstruction of justice charge to fire Mueller. And that's assuming the appointee was approved. Also, when a president is in a weak position like Trump, Congress is less apt to do as he would like since they have to look to their own re-election in the (near) future, and by doing nothing they don't risk ending up on the wrong side of the issue when it's decided.

AveryCO
AveryCO

And now the Congress is moving to protect Mueller from any firing!

FelixCulpa
FelixCulpa

In short "right" is what group (of any size) says it is, "legal" is what the larger government thinks about that groups' ideas of "right", and "wise" depends on what you're trying to accomplish. I've seldom seen anyone suggest that Legal, Right, and Wise are even approximately equal. For all that needs to be said about the subject see Machiavelli.

Philip Carino
Philip Carino

The whole idea of investigating a sitting executive, the President no less makes no sense at all. If it at all impedes in his function to execute laws properly (which hopefully hasn't or isn't happening right now) then it's all in the hands of those who wish to see the current POTUS fail. They do understand that if the potus fails, everyone does. If he succeeds, everyone's part of that too. Hopefully though trying a president comes after he's president and when he's already back to being regular citizen

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