Remembering our fallen heroes on Memorial Day: Are we worthy of their sacrifice?

-edited

So many brave Americans have fought and died for our freedom. What would they think of the country we’ve become?

So many brave Americans have fought and died for our freedom. What would they think of the country we’ve become? Would they lament what some have done with that freedom? Would they still think it was worth their last breath or drop of blood, or would they shed tears for the liberties we gave away without even a shot having to have been fired to take them? Would they weep at the sight of groups like Antifa rioting and destroying property seeking to deny people their freedom of speech? Would those who died in the American Revolution shudder at how many people would forfeit their rights to keep and bear arms, to be free from unwarranted search and seizure for the illusion of safety and security? Would all those hundreds of thousands of Union soldiers cut down in battle throw their hands up dismay at how racially divided we’ve become? What would those who died on foreign soil in WWII think of a Europe, the continent they freed of one form of malignant socialism opt for a more palatable one? How would those who died in the War of 1812 react to football players not honoring the Star Spangled Banner, a song written about the flag some of them literally died to defend? Remember this Memorial Day, those heroes died for more than a piece of land, they died for an idea, an idea that freedom is worth fighting and dying for. They died so that those they left behind could be safe from tyranny and oppression. Let’s not surrender easily what they paid the ultimate price for, that idea of that “shining city on a hill”, of American Exceptionalism.

Comments
No. 1-8
Jon Saltzman
Jon Saltzman

Editor

JP- most people were not disappointed! Great piece!

JP Mac
JP Mac

Silly me thinking that being a veteran would allow me to speak from the point of view of a veteran. I love your criticism of my rhetorical style about using a lot of pathos. Normally my pieces have a bit more logic and I would defer making emotional arguments to the pros on the Left, but I was writing here on the occasion of Memorial Day and about patriotism and American ideals. These aren't subjects that lend themselves to logos. You'll notice that I'm using as my device rhetorical questions about whether Americans today hold the same values and ideals as those of yesteryear. The reader is invited to think about and agree or disagree with them. If you were looking for a logical explanation for American patriotism, sorry to disappoint.

FelixCulpa
FelixCulpa

Actually John, He's asking rhetorical questions of theoretical deceased veterans in order to support his own agenda. He singles out Antifa, "people (who) would forfeit their rights to keep and bear arms", European socialism, and those who kneel at football games. He then states of veterans "They died so that those they left behind could be safe from tyranny and oppression", which may but true, but suggests a false equivalency between "tyranny and oppression", and his previous examples. This type of argument is a cheap emotional appeal that most people reserve for occasions when logic has failed, or was never present to begin with. I used the anthem as a device to illustrate this. I mean really John, we can't allow this type of thing to go unremarked, what if young men and women on the sight see this? Are we to let our youth be corrupted by poor logic? THINK OF THE CHILDREN JOHN! THINK OF THE CHILDREN!

Jon Saltzman
Jon Saltzman

Editor

Felix, read his piece: he's talking about what American's have died for defending our nation, NOT the anthem per se. He's talking about the fight for freedom and wondering if t hrough our petty differences and behavior, we are throwing our freedom away.

FelixCulpa
FelixCulpa

I know there wasn't an official anthem, but Hail Columbia was the most commonly used for occasions of state. There was also no star spangled banner in 1812, so either way I'm assuming his theoretical vets would be a bit mystified.

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