'George' the Snail Marks First Documented Species Extinction of 2019

George the Snail, the last of his species, Achatinella apexfulva, died on Jan. 2.

photo-Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

On January 2, a snail named George shriveled up and died in his tank at the University of Hawaii. He was 14 years old, which for a land snail is pretty long in the tooth (or in George's case, radula). But in all of his years, George never sired any offspring. There were simply no mating partners to be found. In fact, George was the last known member of his species, Achatinella apexfulva. And the moment he slimed off this mortal coil, 2019 experienced its first documented extinction.

While George's death came as a bit of a surprise (it's tough to tell when a snail is ill), the extinction of his species has been a long time coming.

"Researchers and conservationists have been looking for this species [in the wild] for over 20 years and haven't had any luck with finding them," says wildlife biologist David Sischo, the coordinator of Hawaii's Snail Extinction Prevention Program.

Scientists actually thought A. apexfulva had already gone extinct back in the 1990s, until 10 of them were found in 1997 and brought under the university's care. The idea was to set up a captive population whose progeny researchers could one day release into the wild. Unfortunately, none of the baby snails hatched in the lab lasted very long—except George, who was named after the late "Lonesome George," the Pinta Island tortoise who was also the last of his kind.

Read More

Comments