Extreme Ocean Warming Could Further Endanger Albatross Species

As Earth warms due to human-caused climate change, extreme climatic events like heat waves, droughts, and spikes in ocean temperatures have increased and are projected to become even more common by the end of this century.

As Earth warms due to human-caused climate change, extreme climatic events like heat waves, droughts, and spikes in ocean temperatures have increased and are projected to become even more common by the end of this century.
As scientists grapple with the behavioral, ecological and evolutionary impacts of extreme climatic events, the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B created a special June issue to explore what is known on the topic and pioneer new approaches to this challenging and rapidly expanding field of study. The issue, which was published online May 8, 2017, was co-edited by Wood Hole Oceanographic institution (WHOI) biologist Stephanie Jenouvrier.
“The ecological effects that these extreme climatic events will have on already stressed ecosystems are not known,” says Jenouvrier, a population biologist, “but understanding the impacts is crucial to future conservation efforts.”
In addition to her role as co-editor, Jenouvrier is also co-author of a study featured in the special issue, which examines how extreme ocean warming events further stress an already declining population of black-browed albatross in the French Southern and Antarctic Lands.

Read Full Story: Phys.org/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
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