Rising Sea Levels Could Send ‘Climate Migrants’ to Inland Cities in US

When Hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana in 2005, cities inland saw an influx of evacuees escaping the storm and its aftermath. Now, a new University of Georgia study predicts that this could happen again as a result of sea-level rise.

When Hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana in 2005, cities inland saw an influx of evacuees escaping the storm and its aftermath. Now, a new University of Georgia study predicts that this could happen again as a result of sea-level rise.

In a paper published today in Nature Climate Change, researchers estimate that approximately 13.1 million people could be displaced by rising ocean waters, with Atlanta, Houston and Phoenix as top destinations for those forced to relocate.

The study is the first attempt to model the destination of millions of potentially displaced migrants from heavily populated coastal communities.

Originally posted to The Daily Catch : www.theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch

Photo: NC Department of Transportation-Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

To view the Creative Commons license for the image, click here .

Comments
No. 1-2
Richard-C
Richard-C

yes, agree!

earthcat
earthcat

I hope some one reads this posit is very important.

Stories