Study Shows Microplastics Are Accumulating in Fish’s Brains

Calculations have shown that 10 per cent of all plastic produced around the world ultimately ends up in the oceans. As a result, a large majority of global marine debris is in fact plastic waste.

Human production of plastics is a well-known environmental concern, but few studies have studied the effects of tiny plastic particles, known as nanoplastic particles.

“Our study is the first to show that nanosized plastic particles can accumulate in fish brains”, says Tommy Cedervall, a chemistry researcher at Lund University.

The Lund University researchers studied how nanoplastics may be transported through different organisms in the aquatic ecosystem, i.e. via algae and animal plankton to larger fish. Tiny plastic particles in the water are eaten by animal plankton, which in turn are eaten by fish.

According to Cedervall, the study includes several interesting results on how plastic of different sizes affects aquatic organisms. Most importantly, it provides evidence that nanoplastic particles can indeed cross the blood-brain barrier in fish and thus accumulate inside fish’s brain tissue.

Photo: Tanaka Juuyoh/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

To view the Creative Commons license for the image, click here.

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Comments
No. 1-2
geardesignt
geardesignt

ohh i never ever thought that this could happen

brigitte-perreault
brigitte-perreault

Editor

This worries me a lot... Human production of plastics is not only an environmental concern but a health concern as well for humans...

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