Marine Heatwave Caused by Climate Change Cooks Tasmania’s Fisheries

Human-induced climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heat wave off Tasmania’s east coast that lasted 251 days and had an area of impact seven times the size of the island, a new study shows.

Human-induced climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heat wave off Tasmania’s east coast that lasted 251 days and had an area of impact seven times the size of the island, a new study shows.

Climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heatwave off Tasmania’s east coast in 2015/16 that lasted 251 days and at its greatest extent had an area of impact seven times the size of Tasmania, according to a new study published today in Nature Communications.

The marine heat wave reduced the productivity of Tasmanian salmon fisheries, led to a rise in Blacklip abalone mortality, sparked an outbreak of Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome and saw new fish species move into Tasmanian waters.

At its peak intensity, waters off Tasmania were 2.9°C above expected summertime temperatures.

Read Full Story: Phys.org/Alvin Stone/University of New South Wales

Photo: Diego Delso/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

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Comments
No. 1-2
Jack16
Jack16

Have the waters returned to normal, and have these changes gone back to normal?

alisonkhowe
alisonkhowe

Why so much terrible things are happening all around the world... just wondering

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