Great Barrier Reef Radically Transforming Due To Ocean Warming

The Great Barrier Reef is rapidly changing after being hit hard by marine heatwaves, but can we still save them?

A new study published online today in Nature shows that corals on the northern Great Barrier Reef experienced a catastrophic die-off following the extended marine heatwave of 2016.

“When corals bleach from a heatwave, they can either survive and regain their colour slowly as the temperature drops, or they can die. Averaged across the whole Great Barrier Reef, we lost 30 per cent of the corals in the nine month period between March and November 2016,” said Prof Terry Hughes, Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE).

The scientists mapped the geographical pattern of heat exposure from satellites, and measured coral survival along the 2,300-km length of the Great Barrier Reef following the extreme marine heatwave of 2016.

The amount of coral death they measured was closely linked to the amount of bleaching and level of heat exposure, with the northern third of the Great Barrier Reef being the most severely affected. The study found that 29 per cent of the 3,863 reefs comprising the world’s largest reef system lost two-thirds or more of their corals.

Photo: Camille Gerstenhaber/Wikimedia Commons

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