Deep Sea Creatures More Vulnerable To Extinction Than Thought

The deep sea is the world's final frontier, yet we are still having impacts on these remote areas of the ocean.

We have only known about the existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae)—a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman—since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk.

New Oxford University research suggests that past environmental changes may have profoundly impacted the geographic range and species diversity of this family. The findings indicate that such animals may be more vulnerable to the effects of human resource exploitation and climate change than initially thought.

Published in PLoS ONE, the researchers report a comprehensive genetic analysis of the yeti crabs, featuring all known species for the first time and revealing insights about their evolution. All but one of the yeti crab species are found on one of the most extreme habitats on earth, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, which release boiling-hot water into the freezing waters above above them.

The research was conducted by ecologists from Oxford’s Department of Zoology, Ewha Woman’s University in Seoul, South Korea and additional Chinese collaborators.

Photo: NOAA/Wikimedia Commons

To view the Creative Commons license for the image, click here.

Sign up today and take the pledge to help save our world's oceans by visiting us at: www.theterramarproject.org

Comments

Stories