A Glowing Sea: Study Shows 75 Percent of Ocean Animals Make Light

The ocean is a dark, dark place. Below about 656 feet (200 meters), light doesn’t penetrate. Considering that the average depth of the ocean is around 14,000 feet (4,267 m), that leaves a lot of room for inky blackness.

The ocean is a dark, dark place. Below about 656 feet (200 meters), light doesn’t penetrate. Considering that the average depth of the ocean is around 14,000 feet (4,267 m), that leaves a lot of room for inky blackness.

Marine life has figured out a way to cope. New research finds that a full three-quarters of sea animals make their own light.

The study, published April 4 in the journal Scientific Reports, is the first to really quantify animal bioluminescence in the ocean. It turns out that the ability to glow isn’t rare at all.

“I’m not sure people realize how common bioluminescence is,” study researcher Séverine Martini, a postdoctoral researcher at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), said in a statement. “It’s not just a few deep-sea fishes, like the angler fish. It’s jellies, worms, squids … all sorts of things.” Gallery: Images of Glowing Aquatic Life

Originally posted to The Daily Catch : www.theterramarproject.org/thedailycatch

Photo: Shane Anderson NOAA/Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

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