Antarctica Turning Green: Plant Life Getting a Boost From Climate Change

Plant life on Antarctica is growing rapidly due to climate change, scientists have found. Few plants live on the continent, but scientists studying moss have found a sharp increase in biological activity in the last 50 years

Plant life on Antarctica is growing rapidly due to climate change, scientists have found.

Few plants live on the continent, but scientists studying moss have found a sharp increase in biological activity in the last 50 years.A team including scientists from the University of Exeter used moss bank cores—which are well preserved in Antarctica’s cold conditions—from an area spanning about 400 miles.

They tested five cores from three sites and found major biological changes had occurred over the past 50 years right across the Antarctic Peninsula.

“Temperature increases over roughly the past half century on the Antarctic Peninsula have had a dramatic effect on moss banks growing in the region,” said Dr Matt Amesbury, of the University of Exeter.

“If this continues, and with increasing amounts of ice-free land from continued glacier retreat, the Antarctic Peninsula will be a much greener place in the future.

Originally posted to Phys.org: Read Full Story

Photo: Peter Mulligan/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

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